Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Due to time constraints on Monday, this lesson was moved to Tuesday.  In all periods, we re-introduced the concept of clauses.  Since we covered clauses in-depth last year, this lesson focused more on the types of dependent (also known as “subordinate” clauses).  There are two types of clauses: independent and dependent.  While there is only one type independent clause, there are three types of dependent clauses: noun clauses, adjective clauses, and adverb clauses.  Luckily, these clauses act as they are named.

  • A noun clause is a group of related words with a subject and a predicate that together act like a noun.  You can check to see if a clause is a noun clause by seeing if it can be replaced by the word “it.”  If it can, it is a noun clause!
  • An adjective clause is a group of related words with a subject and a predicate that acts like an adjective.  This clause modifies (describes) a noun or pronoun.
  • An adverb clause is a group of related words with a subject and a predicate that acts like an adverb.  This clause modifies (describes) an adjective, a verb, or another adverb.

*Note: Before this lesson on clauses, 7th period went into a little more depth breaking down how to move from a writing prompt to a full-fledged essay on a topic.  The students will provided with the graphic organizer below:

HOMEWORK: Construct 5 questions you still have about clauses (if you have none, write 5 things you know about clauses).  They must be in the form of simple, compound, complex, or compound-complex sentences.

PowerPoint: 9-25-12 Be clause you’re worth it! (Take 2)

Graphic Organizer: Clauses Graphic Organizer

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